Type-A bureaucrat who professionally pushes papers in the Middle East. History nerd, linguistic geek, and devoted news junkie.
9566 stories
·
57 followers

Announcing the Winners of the 2019 McGingerbread Hell Competition

1 Share

Wow! It was another great year for the McGingerbread Hell Gingerbread House Competition! The judges had their work cut out for them selecting between so many fine selections. Congratulations and great job to everyone who submitted an entry in this year’s contest. However, only six houses could make the cut.

Let’s start out with announcing the winners for Honorable Mention.

Honorable Mention: Priced to Sell! by Tina B.

The judges were wowed by the impressive nub, the tumorous turret, and the fantastically mismatched windows.

Quote from the Project Description: A true GEM of a house! 6,738 SF beautifully set on .23 parklike acres. Mediterranian villa in front, stately Federal in the back; it’s the mullet of houses!…Entertain in your beautiful backyard featuring a real StoneTek™ patio! The heavily pruned weeping cherry tree will be a real showstopper in 30-40 years! The largest roof in the neighborhood has Chex shingle roof in molasses brown. 4 BR / 5.5 BA / $899,000 / Days on market - 923

Honorable Mention: Festive Roofline Soup by Jessica C.

The judges LOVED the complexity of the roofline, the absurd gabling, and the 3 car garage.

Quote from the Project Description: Features include: • Flaked almond shingles covering a roofline so complex that it required trigonometrical expertise from my math teacher father to work out measurements…[and] A low maintenance yard as the house takes up almost the entire block! Now accepting offers; the sellers are motivated as the couple are in the middle of divorce proceedings.

Honorable Mention: Vinyl Vanity by Joseph & Kayla S.

The judges were impressed by the impressive garage to roof ratio, the roof detailings, the candy-cane columns, and excellent lawyer foyer.

Quote from the Project Description: This 2 square foot, two and a half story Craftsmen Tudor Post Classical Revival estate is the luxurious home that your friends and neighbors never wanted…The car is truly the heart of Tudor England, so we put the garage proudly up front, where the yawning chasm of the door greets the outside world with disdain…Be sure to schedule your private tour soon, this edifice is sure to not last long. On the market. If you’re curious about the price, you’re probably too economically responsible for this property.

And now, our top 3:

Third Place: A Jersey Thing by Nùria O.

Judges were impressed by the size, shape, and meticulous detailing of the project, which is reminiscent of a truly terrible McModern. Anjulie, seeing the size of the huge roof said “this is some sustainable sh*t.” This project captures the true McMansion ethos in truly making us say “what the hell is going on here?”

Project Description: Inspired by a beatiful RealLife™ McMansion™ in Beach Haven, NJ, this year’s featured McGingerbread mansion is a modern 5-bedroom, 16-bathroom home made entirely in construction-grade gingerbread and held together with royal icing made from free-range egg whites. The nonpareil- and sugar-crystal-covered walls provide both isolation from stormy weather and give a vintage air to counterbalance the futuristic lines of the design…On the back of the house, you can walk out to a large deck (perfect for entertainment) boasting a valuable one-piece handrail. From there you can access the beautiful mediterranean garden, set in candy charcoal and stones, environmentally friendly as it’s practically maintenance free. Don’t miss your chance to visit this unique home—feel the sugar rush!

Second Place: Victorian Opulence by Beth & Tina C.

Reigning McGingerbread champs Beth & Tina C. returned to the scene this year with yet another gorgeous gingerbread. Judges were wowed by the complexity and scale of the project. Sarah was impressed by the intricate piping and lots of frilly details, and the homage to the traditional Victorian gingerbread form. Anjulie described it as “unbearably neat” - she loved the uncantilevered bay window, the detached garage that makes entryway irrelevant, and the hilarious-front balcoiny with half-wall (not code compliant). Kate was impressed by the detailing and the extensive cantilevers which too serious structural engineering to pull off.

Project description: New from the creators that brought you a true monstrosity last year: The Victorian Opulence! Featuring a lovely wrap around porch, adorable detached garage, and a truly magnificent waterfall in the backyard, this monolith of a house features thee decks overlooking somewhat patchy but still rescueable landscaping. Other features include an outdoor patio, a tower for all your princess capturing needs, and a truly cursed facade featuring a curved roof of all things! With several nubbins featuring windows, there is no angle on this house you can’t see out of! Standing at nearly 2 feet tall and with an approximate total floor area of 550 square inches-excluding outdoor seating area-this Victorian style home will surely be the envy of all the gingerbread men in your country club. (Snow removal not included as part of HOA membership fees.)

And finally…

First Prize: Simply Having a Wonderful Building Crime by Erin E.

The judges all agreed: this house was outrageous - its execution was fantastic, and its design was full of so many delightful, humorous details. Sarah remarked: “This one is perfectly McMasion-scaled, with weirdly placed windows and gratuitous features to boot.” Anjulie couldn’t sing the praises enough: “I was particularly taken with the garage that is so far detached it makes the front door totally irrelevant…it’s a castle of grand sadness. The Pete Buttigieg sign is the literal icing on top.” Kate loved the details: the Pete sign, the ridiculously diverse selection of windows, the piped on invasive plants and basketball hoop, and the glass and siding effects. Part of the competition lies in its absurdity and humor, and in that particular category, this house took the cake.

Project description: This home Defies the Ordinary. Located on a 2.3 acre lot, you’ll be the envy of all your neighbors–and can watch from the top of the turret to be sure they’re suitably jealous! Enjoy sitting al fresco under the portico above the garage, or on the hand-laid M&M stone patio! The two-story entryway accounts for just a few of the more than 60 sugar glass windows! All of the walls join up exactly where the architect expected them to, and no windows were covered up on accident!!!

Constructed over two weeks, out of ten pounds of flour, four pounds of powdered sugar, and more than half a gallon of corn syrup, this modest four-story house will surely stand the test of time. It’s been meticulously decorated with royal icing vines, wreaths, and Christmas lights, and landscaped with gingerbread boulders, definitely-naturally-this-green icing grass, and coconut macaroon topiary. The roof stands at 17 inches high, and is crafted from waffle cookie shingles over gingerbread rafters. For sale for just $1,895,000, this house is just perfect for new families or young professionals just starting out!

Special thanks to everyone who entered this year and to our judges Sarah Archer and Anjulie Rao for their contributions in pulling off yet another successful entry our search for the Gingerbread McMansion Hall of Fame!

See you next week with this month’s 1970 McMansion.

If you like this post, and want to see more like it, consider supporting me on Patreon!

There is a whole new slate of Patreon rewards, including: good house of the month, an exclusive discord server, monthly livestreams, a reading group, free merch at certain tiers and more!

Not into recurring donations or bonus content? Consider the tip jar! Or, Check out the McMansion Hell Store! Proceeds from the store help protect great buildings from the wrecking ball.

Read the whole story
hannahdraper
8 hours ago
reply
Washington, DC
Share this story
Delete

Imminent Attacks on Four Embassies But Posts and American Public Not Warned ?

2 Shares
  Iranian Major General in the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) Qasem Soleimani was killed in a targeted U.S. drone strike on 3 January 2020 in Baghdad. This Administration’s public face of this attack, Secretary of State Pompeo went on CNN and said “He was actively plotting in the region to take actions — a big action, […]
Read the whole story
acdha
1 day ago
reply
Washington, DC
hannahdraper
2 days ago
reply
Washington, DC
Share this story
Delete

What the Color 'Haint Blue' Means to the Descendants of Enslaved Africans

1 Share

Beaufort County, South Carolina, a marshy world of low-lying coastal islands, is awash in blue. The cerulean of the skies that darken to shades of cobalt in storm-kissed summers. The blue-gray of the churning Atlantic. The sapphire waters of the rivers and saline estuaries that account for almost 40 percent of the county’s 923 square miles.

But while the color blue dominates Lowcountry skies and waters, for centuries it was nearly impossible for human hands to reproduce. Only indigo—a leggy green plant that emerges from the soil in bushy, tangled clumps—can generate the elusive jewel tones.

In Beaufort County and elsewhere in the Lowcountry of South Carolina and Georgia, blue had the power to protect enslaved Africans and their descendants, known as the Gullah Geechee, from evil spirits. But the color was also the source of incomparable suffering. Indigo helped spur the 18th-century transatlantic trade, resulting in the enslavement of thousands.

article-image

The town of Beaufort, the county seat of the eponymous Lowcountry district, is accented in blue. The elegant riverside town was one of the South’s wealthiest before the Civil War, and one of the few left standing by the Union Army, which set up a base of operations here after its residents skipped town in the Great Skedaddle of 1861.

Dozens of antebellum mansions still line the streets, restored to the opulence of their plantation days. The ceilings of their broad summer porches are painted almost universally in just one color: a soft, robin’s egg blue.

This “haint blue,” first derived from the dye produced on Lowcountry indigo plantations, was originally used by enslaved Africans, and later by the Gullah Geechee, to combat “haints” and “boo hags”—evil spirits who escaped their human forms at night to paralyze, injure, ride (the way a person might ride a horse), or even kill innocent victims. The color was said to trick haints into believing that they’ve stumbled into water (which they cannot cross) or sky (which will lead them farther from the victims they seek). Blue glass bottles were also hung in trees to trap the malevolent marauders.

article-image

While “haint blue” has taken on a life of its own outside the Gullah Geechee tradition—it’s currently sold by major paint companies like Sherwin-Williams, and marketed to well-to-do Southerners as a pretty color for a proper porch ceiling—the significance of the color to the descendents of the Lowcountry’s enslaved people still remains.

In Rantowles, a hamlet 14 miles south of Charleston, Gullah families like Alphonso Brown’s painted their homes in haint blue not just because it is customary, but because they fear the havoc that evil spirits might wreak if they abandoned the tradition.

Yet not all Gullah Geechee identify with the color’s use. Oral histories recorded as late as the 1930s and ’40s mention haint blue, but a lot was lost when the community became less isolated and more spread out during the mid-20th century.

“Haint blue was never mentioned in my family on Hilton Head Island,” says Louise Miller Cohen, founder of the island’s Gullah Museum. “People are saying that we paint our houses blue to ward off the evil spirits. If that was true, all the houses on the island would be painted blue.” Nevertheless, the museum—once the home where her father lived—is painted blue.

article-image

“Indigo dye is deeply rooted in African culture,” says Heather Hodges, executive director of the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor National Heritage Area. So “is the symbolic use of the color blue to ward off ‘evil spirits.”

In her book Red, White, and Black Make Blue, Andrea Feeser describes West African spiritual traditions that included wearing blue beads or clothing for protection. “Fetishes,” powerful amulets made out of everyday objects, also often contained blue materials.

In some cultures, indigo itself has spiritual significance. In Blue Alchemy, director and producer Mary Lance’s film about indigo around the world, women at a Nigerian workshop are documented delivering a prayer to the Yoruba indigo deity Iyamapo.

Haints and boo hags, too, stem from African spiritual traditions—a spirituality in which conjure and color symbolism are essential, according to Rituals of Resistance, Jason R. Young’s book on African-Atlantic religion. Root workers, practitioners of these rituals who often go by the title Dr. Buzzard, were among those forced across the ocean in bondage.

article-image

Almost 300 years after their arrival, there aren’t many Dr. Buzzards left in South Carolina and Georgia. (There are a few, however, including a root worker in Atlanta whose grandparents chose him to train in their spiritual traditions. “I went to live with them when I was a year-and-a-half [old],” he says. “I was 16 when I quit school to do voodoo full time.”)

Yet within recent memory, Lowcountry root workers weren’t so hard to find. In the 1940s, Dr. Buzzard (aka Stepney Robinson) was a fixture at the Beaufort County Courthouse, where he sat at trials “chewing the root” to sway a judge’s ruling. In the 1980s, another Dr. Buzzard (aka Ernest Bratton) shot to fame with his video “Voo Doo, Hoo Doo, You Do,” appearing on Late Night with David Letterman and The Oprah Winfrey Show.

Root workers may have mostly moved on from Beaufort County, but HooDoo beliefs still remain. So does the significance of indigo and the color blue in shaping the Gullah Geechee community. Among their ancestors were over 70,000 men, women, and children brought from West and Central Africa to provide the labor required for the South’s roughly 40-year foray into the plant’s growth and production of indigo dye, according to Young’s book.

Indigo was first planted in South Carolina in 1739. Less than 30 years later, the colony was annually exporting a million pounds of indigo dyestuffs. Today they would be worth more than $30 million a year. At least some of the knowledge for processing indigo dye came from the enslaved themselves: Indigo traditions in West and Central Africa are at least five centuries old.

article-image

At the Nigerian workshop Lance features in her documentary, the plant is pounded with sticks that remove and crush the leaves, which are then formed into balls. The balls are sprinkled with wood ash, then left to dry for seven days before being combined with water in dye pits. In Kano, Nigeria, pits dating back to 1498 are still in use today.

South Carolina’s indigo production came to an abrupt halt at the end of the Revolutionary War. “The people in South Carolina were producing indigo exclusively for the British market,” says Lance. “So when [the United States] was no longer a British colony, they no longer had that market anymore.”

By the mid-19th century, when synthetic blue dye became available, indigo almost disappeared from Beaufort County and the rest of the Lowcountry. Almost. Now a Gullah Geechee movement to reclaim indigo and the blue dye it produces is afoot.

As a child, Cohen played among the remnant indigo planted by her enslaved ancestors. In 2016, she planted her first seeds at the museum.

article-image

“The species that we grow have a peach-color flower,” she explains. Her hope is to grow enough of the plants to be able to process and produce dye to use in local workshops, strengthening her community’s connection to their ancestral past. “I’m interested in learning all I can about the crops that caused my people [the] loss of their freedom,” she says.

Cohen’s sentiment has blossomed elsewhere in the Lowcountry too. Though there aren’t many artisans around who know how to dye with indigo, Hodges says that the color “is widely used by Gullah Geechee visual artists and filmmakers as a way of expressing their shared Gullah Geechee heritage and history with indigo cultivation.” The film Daughters of the Dust; the novel Sassafrass, Cypress & Indigo [sic] by Ntozake Shange; and the artwork of Diane Britton Dunham all feature indigo or the color blue.

Hodges’ organization is in the midst of a year of events that introduce community members to the craft. The reintroduction of natural indigo dyes, she says, has sparked a lot of enthusiasm.

article-image

“Many of the West African techniques involve wax, starch, and stitch-resist techniques, sometimes using stamps,” says Hodges. “That can be difficult to teach. [But] we just did a popular workshop that encouraged people to dye African head wraps and scarves as a way of incorporating African cultural expressions.”

But as indigo undergoes a resurgence in the Lowcountry, along with other traditions including the Gullah language and foodways, the community hasn’t forgotten the inhumane conditions that led to their arrival and early life in the South.

“If repatriation was attached to indigo,” says Cohen, meaning if indigo were part of the discussion regarding what the Gullah Geechee are owed for the horrors their ancestors endured, “they would do everything possible to keep the word from ever being mentioned.”

Read the whole story
hannahdraper
2 days ago
reply
Washington, DC
Share this story
Delete

Göbekli Tepe Suds

1 Share
Göbekli Tepe Suds. Suds (uncountable) lather, foam. (slang) beer. We went out for some pizza and suds

First fires and feasts | Evidence suggests our ancestors, Homo erectus, used and controlled fire at least 400,000 years ago, enabling the first fireside feasts. 

Early drinkers | Brewing can be traced to the Middle East 10,000 years ago, while wine production began 8,000 years ago in Georgia.
Mavi Boncuk |

Archaeologists made an intriguing discovery recently at the neolithic site of Göbekli Tepe in southern Turkey. They uncovered a series of giant stone troughs erected more than 10,000 years ago. And at the bottom of these huge vessels, they found traces of a chemical called calcium oxalate, typically produced during the soaking, mashing and fermenting of grain. It’s a by-product of brewing, in other words.


From this evidence, researchers conclude that Göbekli Tepe was a vast festival site where Stone Age men and women came to feast and to drink beer by the trough-load. Humans have known how to party for a very long time, it would seem. In fact, our love of alcohol can be traced even further into the past, according to scientists who now believe that social drinking played a key role in our evolution as we developed into big-brained, social primates...
“Studies clearly show that there are social and wellbeing benefits to be derived directly from drinking alcohol, especially in relaxed social environments,” said the evolutionary biologist Professor Robin Dunbar of Oxford University. “That is why the practice has persisted for so long.”
Dunbar, a fellow of the British Academy and one of the conference’s organisers, argues that our hunter-gatherer ancestors began to hold feasts at least 400,000 years ago after they learned how to use and control fire. Dinners round firesides helped us to cement relationships as fellow tribesfolk exchanged food, stories and gossip. Alcohol may not have been present at first but could still have become a key factor of feasts fairly quickly, and certainly long before the Neolithic arrived and we began to make brewing troughs.
“Archaic humans may have been very familiar with naturally fermented fruits and may well have consumed them avidly – much as chimpanzees and elephants do in Africa,” said Dunbar.
The crucial point is that all these activities – relating stories, exchanging gossip, telling jokes and singing – trigger the production of endorphins in the brain, he said. “Endorphins in turn generate a positive feeling in a person, similar to that of morphine. So we feel good. And crucially, alcohol also activates the endorphin system, which in itself will enhance social bonds among those who indulge together.”
In other words, alcohol was vital in helping to strengthen social bonding and break down inhibitions – and has done so since the early days of human evolution. Certainly, we had long mastered the art of making the stuff before we made those first stone troughs and pottery vessels 10,000 years ago. It continued to have a considerable influence on our history, however. Take the example of farming. It was once assumed we turned to agriculture and the growing of fields of wheat in order to make bread and so provide reliable sustenance for ourselves. Yet the kind of wheat grown then – known as einkorn – would have made a very poor bread, say researchers. But it would have made excellent beer.
“This leads to the great theory of human history: that we didn’t start farming because we wanted food – there was loads of food around,” says Mark Forsyth, in his book A Short History of Drunkenness. “We started farming because we wanted to booze.”
This idea is backed by others, including Dunbar, who believe beer-making was the initial attraction in turning ourselves from hunter-gatherers into farmers. And, ever since, alcohol has made its mark on our lives, from lubricating parties to complex state rituals.

Maps Source: CHAPTER 1: Ancient Wine: The Search for the Origins of Viniculture By Patrick E. McGovern



"Production and consumption of alcoholic beverages is an important factor in feasts facilitating the cohesion of social groups, and in the case of in organizing collective work," Antiquity paper co-author Oliver Dietrich wrote in an email. Dietrich is an archaeologist for the German Archaeological Institute.

The Göbekli Tepe site in southwestern Turkey, meanwhile, dates to nearly 11,000years ago. Neolithic hunter-gatherers worshipped ancient deities through dancing and feasting at the temple site, which is filled with T-shaped pillars carved with animal shapes and other ancient cultic designs. The site also had what appears to be a primitive kitchen with large limestone troughs that held up to 42 gallons (160 liters) of liquid. The troughs held traces of oxalates, which are produced during the fermentation of grain into alcohol.




Read the whole story
hannahdraper
3 days ago
reply
Washington, DC
Share this story
Delete

The Spy Museum Is Changing Its Torture Exhibit After Backlash

1 Comment

The International Spy Museum’s glitzy new location at L’Enfant Plaza boasts interactive exhibits on espionage, and artifacts like the ice axe used in the assassination of Leon Trotsky.

But not all of its exhibits have impressed visitors. According to a report from Buzzfeed News, the museum has faced increased criticism of its exhibit on torture and enhanced interrogation tactics. According to the outlet, the Spy Museum is now grappling with how it will revise this installation to represent a more complete picture.

The museum includes a section dedicated to George W. Bush-era interrogation techniques, including a recreation of a waterboard. According to Buzzfeed, there’s also a poll asking visitors, “Would you be willing to have the US government torture suspected terrorists if they may know details about future attacks?” When Buzzfeed reporters first visited the museum in June, they witnessed a child visitor lying on the mock waterboard.

The Senate Intelligence Committee concluded in a 2014 report that the Bush-era interrogation methods, which included brutal tactics like waterboarding, were ineffective and that the CIA falsified information in reporting its results to Congress and the White House. That report does not appear in the Spy Museum’s exhibit.

“We recognized it was a sensitive issue,” the Spy Museum’s executive director, Col. Chris Costa, said  of the exhibit on the Intelligence Matters podcast in May, when the new facility opened. “So what we wanted to do is offer two viewpoints: a pro and an against. And we lay that out from experts from the intelligence community that were there when the decisions were made for enhanced interrogation. I feel as an intelligence professional, had we not told those stories, then we weren’t being true to our ethos.”

Still, he didn’t seem to think the exhibit was that disturbing. “First, we have a warning, so parents are going to have to help us make a determination whether their kids should see what’s within the exhibit, in the gallery,” he said on Intelligence Matters. “And I will say that I don’t think it’s terribly troubling, but again, eyes in the beholder. In fact, I think it’s done very thoughtfully.”

In the months that followed, the museum has faced backlash from human rights experts, former intelligence professionals, and politicians alike. Three Democrats on the Senate Intelligence Committee wrote to the museum’s president Tamara Christian last month encouraging the museum to reexamine its exhibit.

In the letter obtained by Buzzfeed, Senators Martin Heinrich, Ron Wyden, and Dianne Feinstein—all members of the Senate Intelligence Committee—said that they were “deeply dismayed to learn about how the museum’s exhibit misrepresents the CIA’s torture program, sanitizing depictions of how techniques were applied, and suggesting that torture is effective in stopping terrorist attacks.”

In a response to the senators, Christian writes that the new exhibit will feature a more comprehensive timeline of the history of interrogation, lay out coercive and non-coercive methods (including “rapport building”), and explore the advances in lie detection technology. The new material will also include the legal definitions of torture, as well as the committee’s study on the CIA’s interrogation program, Christian says in the letter. The changes are expected to be finished by March 2020.

While the committee members said in a statement that they were “pleased” that the museum is reevaluating its exhibit, some critics remain skeptical of the museum’s intentions. Daniel Jones, the chief investigator on the committee’s 6,700-page classified report (played by Adam Driver in the recent movie The Report), told Buzzfeed on Wednesday that the museum’s current promotion of the torture program is unfit for schoolchildren.

“The Spy Museum has been so careless with the facts here that it should cast doubt on the integrity of their entire enterprise,” Jones told the outlet. “Absent a major reversal, our nation’s school leaders should think twice before adding the Spy Museum to their students’ class trip agendas.”

There’s No Paywall Here

DCist is supported by a community of members … readers just like you. So if you love the local news and stories you find here, don’t let it disappear!

Become a Member

The post The Spy Museum Is Changing Its Torture Exhibit After Backlash appeared first on DCist.

Read the whole story
hannahdraper
4 days ago
reply
Jesus Christ, another reason I won't go to that money-pit of an institution.
Washington, DC
Share this story
Delete

Overheard In D.C.: That Guy

1 Comment

Welcome back to Overheard in D.C., DCist’s weekly column of funny, strange, and poignant things that our readers and staff overhear and send in. We’ve been doing it since 2006. Check out the archives here.

We can’t have Overheard in D.C. without your submissions! Email your Overheards to overheard(at)dcist[dot]com and don’t forget to include who was talking, to whom, and in what context.

Sometimes the stereotypes are just true.

Overheard of the Week

Two late twenty-somethings are crossing Pennsylvania Avenue: 

Woman 1: “He acts like he’s on House of Cards or something.”
Woman 2: “Ha, more like Veep.”

Maybe just get an advisor? 

Two college students at lunch at DC Noodles: 

Girl 1: “I just want like Joe Biden or someone to tell me what to major in. No, Liz Warren. I want Liz Warren to take me by the shoulders and tell me what to do.”

Still no  

Crossing the Potomac on Metro: 

Child, looking out the window: “Ooh, is that a pond?”
Mom: “No sweetie, that’s a lake.”

If this isn’t Lasik, we don’t want to know

A woman is walking down Kalorama past Harris Teeter, talking on a cellphone:

“Did I tell you I’m going to Los Angeles? To get my eyes done! … I don’t know, I feel like the doctors here will, like, screw it up.”

???

Three 20-something tourists, two men and a woman, walking towards the Washington Monument:

Guy:  “I took another look at that dick pic last night and I still don’t think it is mine.”

Not exactly a debate champion

On the platform waiting for Metro. A man is speaking to someone over the phone:

Man: “You keep saying it’s 2020 and women don’t need a man. Let me ask you something—can you give yourself an orgasm?”
Woman on the other end of the line, clear as day: “Yes I can.”
Man: “But that would get old after a while.”
Woman appears to hang up on him.

True conversationalists 

Three twenty-something men walking in Dupont around lunchtime Monday:

Guy 1: “I love tacos so much, man.”
Guy 2: “I know man, tacos.”
Guy 3: “Tacos, man.”

So many follow up questions 

Man in late twenties or early thirties walking from the Silver Spring Transit Center, talking on the phone:

“The electric slide! Can you believe it? They made me dance the fucking electric slide! That’s the song that got me kicked out of my third grade dance competition!”

As always, we rely on you to overheard the good stuff and send it our way. Make sure to tell us who was speaking to whom and in what context.

The post Overheard In D.C.: That Guy appeared first on DCist.

Read the whole story
hannahdraper
4 days ago
reply
Not exactly a debate champion

On the platform waiting for Metro. A man is speaking to someone over the phone:

Man: “You keep saying it’s 2020 and women don’t need a man. Let me ask you something—can you give yourself an orgasm?”
Woman on the other end of the line, clear as day: “Yes I can.”
Man: “But that would get old after a while.”
Woman appears to hang up on him.
Washington, DC
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories