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Ottoman Turkish Links in DC | Washington Monument

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Print of the proposed Washington Monument by architect Robert Mills (1781–1855), Proposed Plan circa 1845–1848

Mavi Boncuk | 


During the construction of the Washington Monument only a handful of nations donated stone. The Ottoman Empire, a predecessor of the Republic of Turkey, gave this stone as a gesture of friendship to the United States.

Level: 190-ft. 

Donor: Sultan of Turkey Dates: 1854/1885 
Original material: marble, possible gilding Dimensions: 2' 8" x 5'
Original inscription: [text in Turkish] Translation of text: So as to strengthen the friendship between the two countries. Abdul-Mejid Kahn has also had his name written on the monument to Washington. 

[Frederick L. Harvey, compiler, “History of the Washington National Monument and Washington National Monument Society,” 57th Congress, 2d Session, Senate Document No. 224, Washington: Government Printing Office, 1903. ] [1]

Ottoman Sultan Abdul Mejid I [2] donated $30,000 toward the construction of the Washington monument. The Sultans' donation was the largest single donation toward the building of the Washington Monument. The Sultan's intention was to bridge peace between the Ottomans and the Americans. The stone containing the Turkish inscriptions commemorating this event is on the 190-foot level. The translation of the inscriptions state, "To support the continuation of true friendship Abdul Mejid Khan's clear and pure name was written on the lofty stone in Washington.": 128  It combines the works of two eminent calligraphers: an imperial tughra by Mustafa Rakım's student Haşim Efendi, and an inscription in jalī ta'līq script by Kazasker Mustafa Izzet Efendi, the calligrapher who wrote the giant medallions at Hagia Sophia in Istanbul.[3]

Ottoman Sultan Abdul Mejid I Portrait by Konstantin Cretius 



The Washington Monument is an obelisk within the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built to commemorate George Washington, once commander-in-chief of the Continental Army (1775–1784) in the American Revolutionary War and the first President of the United States (1789–1797). Located almost due east of the Reflecting Pool and the Lincoln Memorial, the monument, made of marble, granite, and bluestone gneiss, is both the world's tallest predominantly stone structure and the world's tallest obelisk.

The Washington Monument was originally intended to be located at the point at which a line running directly south from the center of the White House crossed a line running directly west from the center of the U.S. Capitol on Capitol Hill. French born and military engineer Pierre (Peter) Charles L'Enfant's 1791 visionary "Plan of the city intended for the permanent seat of the government of the United States ..." designated this point as the location of the proposed central equestrian statue of George Washington that the old Confederation Congress had voted for in 1783, at the end of the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) in a future American national capital city.[31][D] The ground at the intended location proved to be too unstable to support a structure as heavy as the planned obelisk, so the monument's location was moved 390 feet (118.9 m) east-southeast.

[1] 1852: “His Imperial Majesty Sultan Abd-al-Majid, through John P. Brown, of the U.S. Legation, has signified his intention of contributing to the national monument to Washington, a block of marble to contain the cipher of the Sultan, and a suitable inscription.—Boston Daily Adv. [Providence Daily Journal, October 16, 1852.] 

1853: “By a late letter from Constantinople we learn that the stone which the Sultan of Turkey is having prepared for the National Washington Monument is being done ‘in the handsomest style, and will do his Imperial Majesty credit.’ . . .” [DNI, May 7, 1853.] 

1853: “This block is said to be of white marble, (it has not yet been received,) and the sculpture and inscription are richly gilded. . . .” [DNI, October 11, 1853.] 

1854: “May 11, 1854 New York: E. Whittlesey from Aug O. Van Lennep, according to the instruction of F.W. Edeloff, who has the pleasure of inclosing the bill of lading of the block of marble sent by the Sultan of Turkey and shipped abroad the Schooner Arctic and which is expected to sail next Saturday.” [MR] • 1903: “Block is of white marble, highly polished, and ornamental.” [source]  

[2] Abdulmejid I ( عبد المجيد اول‎, Abdülmecîd-i evvel,Birinci Abdülmecid; 25 April 1823 – 25 June 1861), was the 31st Sultan of the Ottoman Empire and succeeded his father Mahmud II on 2 July 1839.

His reign was notable for the rise of nationalist movements within the empire's territories. Abdulmejid wanted to encourage Ottomanism among secessionist subject nations and stop rising nationalist movements within the empire, but despite new laws and reforms to integrate non-Muslims and non-Turks more thoroughly into Ottoman society, his efforts failed.

He tried to forge alliances with the major powers of Western Europe, namely the United Kingdom and France, who fought alongside the Ottoman Empire in the Crimean War against Russia. In the following Congress of Paris on 30 March 1856, the Ottoman Empire was officially included among the European family of nations.

Abdulmejid's biggest achievement was the announcement and application of the Tanzimat (reorganization) reforms which were prepared by his father and effectively started the modernization of the Ottoman Empire in 1839. For this achievement, one of the Imperial anthems of the Ottoman Empire, the March of Abdulmejid, was named after him.

[3] Notified the Society that the [Charlestown] stone had been shipped on the Baltimore Packet and from Baltimore to Washington by rail;” “the block of marble sent by the Sultan of Turkey and shipped abroad the Schooner Arctic and which is expected to sail next Saturday,” [No primary sources available, in: Richman.] and “the drearisome trip of three months across the country was made principally by ox team.” [Ray C. Colton, “Brief History of the Deseret Stone,” in “Utah State Memorial Stone,” Proceedings held January 4, 1951, . . . Presented by Mr. Watkins, March 12, 1951, 82nd Congress, 1st Session, Senate Document No. 12.]


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For 200 Years, Chiles En Nogada Has Been An Iconic, And Patriotic, Mexican Meal

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The chile en nogada — a stuffed poblano pepper covered in a walnut sauce — has become a classic Mexican dish. The version plated here comes from Ricardo Muñoz Zurita

In celebration of Mexico's Independence Day, many people will eat the green, white and red dish of stuffed and smothered peppers. Noted chef and cookbook author Pati Jinich is among them.

(Image credit: Omar Torres/AFP via Getty Images)

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Updated COVID Guidelines: A Flow Chart A Labyrinth A Clusterfuck

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Vaccine Research

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Honestly feel a little sheepish about the amount of time and effort I spent confirming "yes, the vaccine helps protect people from getting sick and dying" but I guess everyone needs a hobby.
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acdha
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3 public comments
sjk
2 days ago
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I bet the 14 thousand people who died from the "vaccine" wished they had don etheir own reasearch. I bet the hundreds of thousands of people who had serious negative reaction ot the "vaccine" had done their own research. Check the CDC's VARES data that Bit Tech and Big Media is trying to suppress. Also do your own research. the "vaccine" does not prevent you from contracting the disease and it does not prevent you from transmitting it to others. All the "vaccine" does is reduce (but not eliminate) your chances of ending up in the ICU. I've done my own research and I have found that the "vaccine" doesn't do much for society in general and it should be an individual choice made voluntarily. Mandating ineffective "vaccines" only increases vaccine hesitancy and increases distrust in "experts" and authoritarian government.
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CallMeWilliam
3 days ago
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I recently had the displeasure of talking with an Unvaccinated, who thinks it is a personal decision and private. He didn't understand why anyone would care about anyone else, and not only lacks empathy but lacks the ability to understand that other people posses empathy.

That's what we're up against.
lamontcg
3 days ago
Not your private personal choice to turn yourself into a biological weapon
JEFFnSoCal
2 days ago
quote from the Mayo Clinic site: "Antisocial personality disorder, sometimes called sociopathy, is a mental disorder in which a person consistently shows no regard for right and wrong and ignores the rights and feelings of others. People with antisocial personality disorder tend to antagonize, manipulate or treat others harshly or with callous indifference. They show no guilt or remorse for their behavior. Individuals with antisocial personality disorder often violate the law, becoming criminals. They may lie, behave violently or impulsively, and have problems with drug and alcohol use. Because of these characteristics, people with this disorder typically can't fulfill responsibilities related to family, work or school."
QuaCKeReD
1 day ago
Too true! Unless you have a medical reason not to take the vaccine that could help save someone else’s life, just bloody take it already!!!
lamontcg
1 day ago
I can't reply to sjk, but they're an idiot. https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.09.08.21263276v1 for an example of how to interpret data similar to VAERS for hazard ratios for the vaccines and the virus. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7037e2.htm recent study showing pfizer/moderna still 77%/92% effective against infection. We don't have studies against delta, but against alpha the vaccines reduced transmissibility. https://www.timesofisrael.com/80-of-vaccinated-covid-carriers-didnt-spread-virus-in-public-spaces-report/
lamontcg
1 day ago
Why do people who parrot the the same talking points as all the other idiots always claim that they're "doing their own research"? I think they mean they read something that sounded technical on some blog post which reinforced what they want to believe and they think this is research. None of them sit down with medrxiv and learn how to read through the latest preprints and look for articles that challenge your biases rather than reinforce them.
alt_text_bot
3 days ago
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Honestly feel a little sheepish about the amount of time and effort I spent confirming "yes, the vaccine helps protect people from getting sick and dying" but I guess everyone needs a hobby.

CB on the Road

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On the fringes of the Caucasus in Turkey’s easternmost corner, Kars may be the most architecturally unique city in the country. This is primarily due to the austere yet awe-inspiring Baltic-style black stone buildings built by the Russian empire more than a century ago, when it ruled the region. With a mixed population of Turks, Kurds and Azerbaijanis, and the stark visual influence of its Russian and Armenian past, may it be no surprise that this small city presents more than the sum of its parts when it comes to cuisine, and has more to offer than the cheese and honey it is noted for nationwide.

Well-known as the last stop on the iconic day-long Eastern Express train route, and for the nearby majestic ruins of the ancient Armenian city of Ani, Kars is blanketed by snow in the winter and features unpredictably chaotic weather in the summer – at least during our last visit this August, where it was warm and sharply sunny one moment, with thunderstorms and marble-sized pellets of hail pouring from the sky the next. Arriving in the early afternoon and narrowly escaping the violent hailstorm while on the bus from the airport, we quickly settled in at our hotel in a smartly-restored 19th-century Russian building on the northern edge of town. We made haste to snag a late lunch at Tortum Cağ Kebap.

Perhaps Turkey’s perfect cut of meat, cağ kebap hails from the neighboring region of Erzurum, of which Tortum is a district. Cağ comes from the Armenian and Georgian word for metal skewer, another indication of the transcultural nature of this part of the country. On a spit like döner, but roasted horizontally rather than vertically, cağ kebab is lamb marinated in salt, pepper and onion cooked in the foreground of wooden flames as it is rotated. Individual skewers are then cut from the massive meat cylinder while still on the rare side, then transferred to a smaller charcoal cooking station where they are finished off perfectly and served alongside paper-thin lavaş flatbread, yogurt, pickled peppers, acılı ezme (pepper spread), sliced onions and a salad of chopped tomatoes and cucumbers doused in lemon.

The meat was sumptuous, reasonably fatty and salty with none of the gamy scent of lamb; we polished off five skewers effortlessly. The friendly family running the place hailed not from Erzurum but rather the province of Ardahan to Kars’ north, and it easily ranks among the most succulent çag kebap in our experience (albeit these were in Istanbul and Ankara). This superior form of döner can be enjoyed around the country – as long as it is cooked to perfection in the hands of the right usta.

For supper, we stopped at a Kars classic that we dined at during our first visit to the city in 2016, Hanımeli. Another family-run restaurant with rustic décor and a menu influenced by the broader region, we ordered revan köfte, an Azerbaijani dish consisting of a flavorful fist-sized meatball loaded with herbs and spices, balanced by a sour cherry in the dead center. (Careful, it has a pit!) It comes in a light broth alongside huge hunks of boiled potatoes and a small plate of short-cut noodles and lentils that we dunked in the broth afterward. We hoped for some of the excellent Georgian wine Hanımeli served during our first meal five years ago, but settled for a nice glass of red produced by Turkey’s dwindling Assyrian community in the southeastern province of Mardin.

With a mixed population of Turks, Kurds and Azerbaijanis, and the stark visual influence of its Russian and Armenian past, may it be no surprise that this small city presents more than the sum of its parts when it comes to cuisine, and has more to offer than the cheese and honey it is noted for nationwide.

After a light breakfast the next day, we set off in search of another Kars specialty, and perhaps the heartiest stew we’ve encountered: piti. Sliced squares of flatbread are covered in a turmeric-laced bath of chickpeas and a hunk of mutton still on the bone, yet in danger of falling off at first touch. We ambled over to the gritty market-area part of town, where everything from produce to building equipment is sold on dusty streets. We dipped into Serhat Lokantası, an esnaf lokantasi (tradesmen’s restaurant) packed to the gills with older men on their lunch break. They were fresh out of piti, but pointed us in the direction of another restaurant and pledged to save us a portion the next day. (We couldn’t make it, but felt obligated to give a shout out to the thoughtful proprietor).

Just around the corner at Yeniçağ Lokantası, a smaller joint with a similar setting, we quickly tucked into our piti as soon as the waiter poured the chickpeas and mutton over the flatbread, the foundation of this formidable stew. We (easily) separated meat from bone and devoured our portion, fighting the urge to dunk chunks of crispy fresh bread into the bowl.

Several years ago, the popularity of the Eastern Express exploded all at once, rapidly becoming a trend among young Turkish people documenting the long journey through Anatolia, posting photos and videos on Youtube and Instagram. That brought some much-needed cash into Kars, which is still more run-down than it should be given its rich collection of beautiful historic buildings. However, elegant new restaurants, buzzing cafes and ongoing restoration projects sponsored by the EU have helped spruce up the city. In GastroKars, the city has gotten the venue it deserves. Despite its clunky moniker, the restaurant and its carefully-selected, elegant décor, is the closest thing in town to a meyhane. In addition to a variety of mezes and local specialties, the GastroKars menu offers a number of Russian dishes, an ode to the city’s heritage.

We started with a buoyant, refreshingly flavorful salad of cubed beets with cabbage and peas dyed cranberry red from swimming in the purple juices. Alongside came soft cheese dipped in flour and lightly fried, a plate of pickles and Ali Nazik, a meze consisting of yogurt infused with smoked eggplant and garlic. We were blown away by this otherwise simple dish because of the standout yogurt, perhaps the best we’ve ever had – truly a shining accolade in a country that can stake claim in the title for the world’s yogurt ambassador. This dairy dream came from the nearby village of Boğatepe, which sources the best of the eski kaşar (aged cheddar) that Kars is most famous for in the country. If a pool was filled with this yogurt, we would dive in and inhale. Initially full from the appetizers, as we sipped glass after glass of rakı, our appetite crept back to the table. Though disappointed to learn that Chicken Kyiv was not available, we ordered a chicken schnitzel fried to perfection and served with a half-baked potato encrusted with a healthy layer of slightly-charred cheese.

Before heading to the airport, we went back to Tortum Cağ Kebap just after noon. The usta was careful to explain that since the hulking kebab had just started cooking, the outer layers would be a bit tougher and saltier, adding that some people prefer it that way. It was just as delicious, and we finished off three skewers with ease. With some time to spare, we walked around the center of town and admired the fabulous architecture of Kars, stylistically unmatched elsewhere in Turkey, before hopping into a cab and flying back to the country’s other northern corner, charmed by the city and nourished by its culinary delights.

*Note: Readers familiar with Turkey may be aware that baked kaz (goose) is the city’s most famous dish. It is also the most expensive item on any menu in town, and on previous visits we have been underwhelmed by its presentation in the city’s more well-known restaurants. If you are curious about goose while in Kars, we recommend trying it in the home of a local.

The post CB on the Road appeared first on Culinary Backstreets.

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Pagans in the shell?

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[Thanks to PATRICK ANDERSEN]

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fxer
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Pagans on the half-shell, druid turtle power
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